Blog Archives

Planning for the Expected – Preparing for the Unexpected

In an increasingly complex world, successful organizations and companies may well be those who will build or acquire a capacity to respond, react and recover quickly and effectively from natural or man-made hazards. In fact, resiliency may constitute a competitive advantage and a mean to sustain and pursue the mission of these organizations. We live

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Red-flagging Canada’s children on no-fly lists

Nearly two dozen children, some as young as six weeks old, have been red-flagged as airline threats by the Canadian government with little recourse to extricate themselves from a highly secretive no-fly list.

The embarrassing revelations for the government have come to light since January 1, after the father of Adam Ahmed, aged six, posted a photo of an airline computer screen showing his son listed as DHP – or « deemed high profile ».

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Increasing Resilience against the Threat of Terrorism

As 2015 draws to a close, and we reflect on the recent media headlines, we can appreciate the level of uncertainty that is affecting our society, along with the unpredictability of the threats we are facing, from weather hazards to terrorist attacks.

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For a collaborative model to govern public security In Canada for the 21st century

But what if we didn’t have to replace each retiring police officer? Given a blank canvas, how would we organize ourselves to better align security investments with resources availability? In this article, we will propose a new model for public security, based on four pillars, to leverage the complementary values and strengths found in the public and private sectors.

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« Canada’s evolving no-fly list—and why changes to it were inevitable »

Canada’s “no-fly list” is, by design, a tight-lipped operation—a database so top-secret that the people on it have no idea (until they try to board an airplane). The federal government won’t even reveal how many names the list contains, insisting that such basic disclosure could somehow help a terrorist plan an attack. Reported estimates range from 500 to 2,000 entries, which means someone is way off.

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HCiWorld, la première compagnie canadienne possédant la certification « Certified Sports Security Professional » (CSSP).

Le National Center for Spectator Sport Safety and Security (NCS4) de l’Université Southern Mississippi annonçait en octobre 2014 qu’Yves Duguay était le premier candidat international à avoir obtenu la certification de Certified Sport Security Professional (CSSP). Outre sa vaste expérience professionnelle de la sécurité dans l’aviation civile et la sécurité publique, M. Duguay renforce, grâce à cette certification,

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Security and the P3

Value creation is at the heart of everything we do, whether we’re self-employed, working for a private company or in a public agency. We provide products and services that are valuable to our clients and the public we serve. Corporate objectives, as a general rule, seek to continuously improve that value creation potential, turning to innovation, technology, best practices and alternatives to create ever more effective and efficient solutions.

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Security Screening: improving human performance for greater reliability

In an article published in ASI last June, I wrote that the security checkpoint is where commercial and security interests can merge to benefit operators, passengers and screeners. I suggested as well, that planning and investing in the design of checkpoints, applying innovative queuing techniques, valuing the time passengers spend waiting and offering security services with aptly recruited and trained personnel, is a source of value creation that has not yet been fully exploited.

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Checkpoint Queuing: learning lessons from Walt Disney

The air transportation business is changing and adapting rapidly to passengers’ expectations, using data and innovative technologies, in an effort to meet its clients’ needs. We have learned, through studies conducted by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), that passengers want to exercise more control over their journey and that a large proportion of them prefer self-service and mobile applications.

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Risk based security: What is acceptable or tolerable?

I was recently asked to speak at a conference about risk based security in an attempt to define what could be an acceptable level. The first thought that came to mind was whether or not, as a society, we are ready to accept any risk at all, when it comes to civil aviation? Maybe we should simply talk about what is tolerable. Both expressions, however, implicitly refer to measuring the value of security and that is quite a challenge for the air transportation industry.

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